There is something I hold dear

There is something that I hold dear
It’s a roomy black matron that I revere

Rugged, but feminine is this beast
Extremely adaptable, to say the least

It’s the Angus cow of much renown
There is no equal to be found

She’s maternal and fertile, and easy to calve
A quality that is certainly good to have

Her calves are vigorous and jump to their feet And when fed-out, yield high quality meat
She’s easy to care for with maintenance minimal
And contrary to belief, she is very gentle

On what she is fed I’ve seen other types try
Their competition lags – Of that I don’t lie

But this cow, comes through with great zeal
Does it with ease and preserves eye-appeal

If you ask why it’s Angus I feed
It’s basically the cow – She’s the strength of the breed!

(Recalled from the years when I bred cattle in Montana)

 

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The Varied Thrush – The Northern Robin

by Dave Hanks

If you are in “wild” country, and will but stop to listen, there is a whole cornucopia of sounds. Some sounds, like Elk bugling or geese honking overhead, are very intriguing. One such sound haunted my wife and I over and over again whenever we were in northern Canada. It was a bird call. We could never pin-point the location from which it came and, because it was a call we were not familiar with, could not identify the species. One evening, southward bound out of the Yukon into northern British Columbia, we were resting our bodies by lying in an open-air hot pool at Liard Hot Springs, B.C. We heard that haunting call again, very close this time. It was coming from a branch just above our pool. It was a Varied Thrush, and it was very mesmerizing to be soaking in hot water, out of doors, and having that bird serenade us!

This Thrush is slightly smaller than the American Robin, but it also has a reddish-orange breast. The breast, however, has a bluish stripe across it. The face also has a stripe across the eye, and the male’s back and crown are a bluish tint. This summer resident of the far north migrates to the Washington, Oregon, and California coasts for the winter months. We have even been lucky enough to have had one of them in our yard one spring – a rare southern Idaho occurrence.

Varied Thrushes like to nest in mature, coniferous woodlands that are dense and moist. If you have been in the far north, you will realize that there are lots of insects. These birds like to spend much time in the trees feeding upon them and will defend their feeding territory from intruders. They do this by first turning their back and giving a tail-up display. If that doesn’t work, the male will then turn to face the problem and extend his wings to display the colors on his under-wings, plus the white tips on his tail. The tail is then extended over his head.

The logging of mature forests has caused a reduction of breeding populations of this species. My wife has a love affair with this beautiful bird, and we would feel sad if we could no longer hear its eerie song.

Along the Oregon coast in February

Ears are an interesting adaptation

This photo is of a Black-Tailed Jackrabbit – photographed in southern Texas. “What big ears you have!” – “All the better to hear you with.” So goes the dialogue in a popular children’s story. However, ears do more than listen. They are also a mechanism to dissipate heat in warm climates. ALLEN’S RULE states: Animals that live close to the equator, have longer appendages & a smaller body mass (greater percent surface area) to get rid of excess heat – ones closer to the poles, have shorter appendages and a larger body mass (less percent surface area) in order to conserve heat. Thus, jackrabbits in Texas have longer ears than the ones here in Idaho.

Jackrabbits have extra long hind legs, which enable them to bound in 20 foot leaps and cover the ground at 45 miles an hour. Besides running, they find protection by crouching under the sparse desert or prairie vegetation. They do not live in burrows but have scrapes under bushes where they lay in the shade during the day. Twilight and nighttime are their most active times.

Grass, sage, and cactus (in southern states) are their main food sources. They nibble around cactus spines until a hole is made big enough to insert their head. The soft inner tissue is then consumed. Around agriculture areas, they can be a problem, when their population peaks. Many alfalfa fields, on the edge of the desert, have been stripped during these periods. Also, rabbits are coprophagous. They have inefficient digestion & that requires them to pass all food through their digestive system twice – by eating their own dung.

Baby jacks are born in open nests. These are concealed in grass or under a bush. There are usually around 8 born and they can walk almost immediately. However, they do not leave the nest until they are about 4 weeks old. Rabbits are renowned for their reproductive ability and this is good because they are prey for so many different kinds of predators.

In the dark of night, when one is driving through rabbit country, their eyes gleam in your headlights. They seem to be everywhere – darting out in front of your vehicle and narrowly missing getting hit. Sometimes one will get run over and is left on the road as carrion for scavenging birds to feast upon.

Marsh Wren: A very vocal, perky fellow

You hear them long before you can locate where they’re at. This little “bundle-of-energy” builds a large nest for such a small bird. The nest hangs between the Bulrushes or Cattails – the habitat which they prefer. The nest is domed, but has a hole in the side for entrance. The male builds the nest. In fact, he builds several nests in hopes that one of them will appeal to a female. Or better yet – several females will be attracted to his nests. The female, after nest selection, will line it with soft materials.

It may be a little brown bird (4-5”), but it’s anything but dull. Like other wrens, its tail is striped with crossways bands and points straight up into the air. This gives the bird a very saucy demeanor. It’s an energetic singer, rarely quiet for very long. Both sexes sing. The male sings long and loud to proclaim his territory, and a softer, quieter song for courtship. The female’s song, while sitting on the nest, is the softest of all.

The female alone, incubates the eggs – which may be as many as 8 to 10 in temperate zones or as few as 2 or 3 in hot areas. Two weeks of incubation and two weeks to fledging is normal. The male helps in the feeding of the chicks, and they raise more than one brood each year.

A photo file of marsh species is not complete without a picture of this saucy little bird. They bob up and down through the marsh sedges, and you must be quick to catch one out in the open.

(This one was captured by sitting in a blind on the water’s edge)

Phainopepla or “The Black Cardinal”

by Dave Hanks

The Phainopepla only looks like a Cardinal in its body configuration and crest. It is actually in a different family – a family known as silky flycatchers. They are closely related to waxwings. The erect crest, deep red eye, silky black body, and white wing patches (seen when in flight) give it a distinctive aura. The female is a brownish-gray, but still quite distinctive. She shows evidence of the white in her wings while perched – which the male doesn’t. I personally think that the female of this species is as attractive as the male.

This bird is found in the arid regions of the south-western USA. They prefer vegetative tangles in trees, such as old Mistletoe, in which to nest. They have a special relationship with mistletoe. They not only nest in it, but feed upon the berries and spread the seeds. This black flycatcher also eats a great quantity of insects.

Their flight is fluttery but direct, and their call is a low-pitched, whistled “wurp.” They will raise two broods a year. The second nesting occurs after they have moved into habitat that is cooler and wetter.

Whenever we find ourselves in the arid regions of Southern California, we almost always experience this bird. My wife is always calling to me to come and see a bird. The bird is usually gone by the time I arrive. The bird in this picture was an exception. He sat there patiently and allowed me to photograph him.

This male is perched in Mesquite

The Bobcat – A Surprise in the Grass

My wife and I have often mused about how one of us could say: “I wish we would see a ——-.” Often that animal would suddenly appear around the next corner. Such was the case one California evening. We were hiking and scouring the area for animals. I made the comment: “I wish we would see a Mountain Lion” and my wife said: “Well, there’s one”. It was a cat all right, but not a lion. It was a Bobcat hunkered down in the grass, waiting for us to pass it by. It must have felt hidden, because it allowed me to stalk quite close.

Lynx rufus is the size of a raccoon and looks like an overgrown house cat – except for the ear tufts and bobbed tail. Its color is usually a yellowish-brown spotted with black, gray, and white. While not as big as its cousin the Lynx, it is more tenacious. It is strong for its size and will attack larger animals. However, most of its prey consists of ground birds and small mammals. These are caught by careful stalking or by ambush. Rabbits and hares are especially preferred. The availability of prey species dictates its range, which can be anywhere between 5 and 50 square miles.

Bobcats will den in dense thickets, hollow logs, or in trees. They have a gestation of 50 to 60 days and usually give birth to two litters a year. Two kittens per birth is average.

It is an excellent tree climber and climbs to escape danger. If you come upon Bobcat tracks, note that the hind print will partially cover the fore print. Like all wild American felines, it is solitary, nocturnal, and secretive. We were very lucky to see one.

bobcat2

Trying to hide in tall grass

Vivid white against dark vegetation

One animal, that was guaranteed to get student attention on high school biology field trips, was the SNOWY EGRET. The vivid whiteness, in the morning light, was a real attention getter. This 24” bird has a satiny white body, black legs with yellow feet, a yellow patch in front of the eye, and a long, narrow, dark bill. Its call is a loud, nasal squawk. A related species is the Great Egret, which is larger, has dark feet, and a yellow bill.

Their habitat is along the shallows of rivers, shallow ponds, or the shallow inlets along ocean coasts. These brackish waters furnish fish, crustaceans, amphibians, small snakes, and other aquatic forms that make up the egret’s diet. Foraging with other egrets makes for greater feeding success.

These very social birds not only feed together, but by nesting together they are provided a better alarm system against predators. Their nests may be found on the ground or 30 feet up in a tree. Breeding takes place in March and early April and is preceded with a “stretch display.” This involves the male pumping his body up and down with his bill extended skyward. He also fluffs out the feathers on his breast. Mating results in 3 to 6 eggs that both sexes incubate. The young fledge in 14 days and reach maturity in one or two years.

Egrets were nearly exterminated. This was due to a fashion trend that required feather plumes for women’s hats. They have since made a comeback. To see this beautiful bird, pay a visit along the Snake River, especially in the shallows and ditches below Minidoka Dam. They will be carefully stepping, sinister-like, through the water or standing very still and stately.

(Stalking the shallows – Yellow feet agleam)